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Follow in the footsteps of some of the best and brightest young journalists by applying to The New York Times Student Journalism Institute.

Students at work during The New York Times Student Journalism Institute in Manhattan in 2019.

Participants must be either enrolled college students (or December or May graduates) who are members of these leading national organizations focused on diversity: the National Association of Black Journalists, the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, the Asian American Journalists Association or the Native American Journalists Association; or students (or December or May graduates) at a historically black college or university.

The Institute in 2021

The coronavirus pandemic created many logistical changes for the 2021 Institute. Students joined in a remote intensive…


Mubarak Soulemane’s family tried to assure that his schizophrenia did not define his life. But one day, while he was in a manic episode, his family said, a police shooting took his life.

The family of Mubarak Soulemane praying at the New Jersey cemetery where he is buried. Mr. Soulemane, 19, had schizophrenia, and his family knew when an episode was coming on. But they couldn’t save him when, during a manic episode, he was killed in January 2020 by a Connecticut State trooper after the police said he stole a car. (Photographs by Yehyun Kim/NYT Institute)

This article is a project from The New York Times Student Journalism Institute, a professional development program for collegiate journalists.

By Yehyun Kim

Rain or shine, someone rang the bell of Mubarak Soulemane’s house in New Haven, Conn., every morning for a year. When Mr. Soulemane opened the door, a nurse stood with medications. The nurse was a reminder to Mr. …


They say their sons were tortured by Chicago police officers. Now, they’re pushing for justice and the abolition of the police.

This video is a project from The New York Times Student Journalism Institute, a professional development program for collegiate journalists.

By Christopher Vazquez

After Rosemary Cade’s son was incarcerated, she joined Mamas Activating Movements for Abolition and Solidarity, a Chicago-based organization that works with mothers and caregivers affected by police violence.

The organization advocates for the abolition of prison and the police. Its members, however, have a diverse range of ideas around abolition and justice. These mothers and the organization’s leaders grapple with complex questions about how to confront a criminal justice system they believe has failed them.

Read more about Christopher Vazquez and his work.

Mamas Activating Movements for Abolition and Solidarity, or MAMAS, tries to amplify the voices of mothers and caretakers affected by police violence. (Christopher Vazquez/NYT Institute)

“My goal is to produce work that is impactful and can service both the people that I’m covering and the people engaging with my work.”

Stories that Christopher Vazquez has published in The Daily Northwestern hang on his bedroom wall. One, about Evanston Township High School, focuses on the families of students and alumni who were fatally shot. (Christopher Vazquez/NYT Institute)

By Shiyu Xu

During the summer before his junior year of high school, Christopher Vazquez walked around his neighborhood in Kendall in Miami with his iPhone, filming videos for the first time for his broadcast journalism club.

Begun as just a personal interest, Christopher’s passion for videography and storytelling grew and shifted into a dream to bring meaningful impact to a larger audience. After high school, Christopher decided to pursue a journalism degree.

Christopher, 21…


On the first day of 2021, his family learned of his death in Newark, N.J. Months later, they still know very little about what happened.

This video is a project from The New York Times Student Journalism Institute, a professional development program for collegiate journalists.

By Shiyu Xu

On Jan. 1, 2021, Carl Dorsey’s family learned that he had been fatally shot a few minutes after midnight by a plainclothes Newark Police Department detective. Home surveillance video released on Jan. 19 by the New Jersey attorney general, Gurbir S. Grewal, shows Mr. …


Her primary passion is to focus on people who are not covered by the mainstream media. “I do believe that everyone has a story to tell.”

Shiyu Xu, 24, in New Jersey, where she lives. She is a multimedia journalist passionate about telling the stories of underreported communities. (Photographs by Shiyu Xu/NYT Institute)

By Priyanka Suryaneni

A multimedia journalist passionate about telling the stories of “everyday people,” Shiyu Xu realized her life calling early in her childhood.

In May 2008, when an earthquake in Sichuan, China, wreaked havoc, killing tens of thousands of people, Shiyu an 11-year-old, watched the breaking news at her home in Xi’an, China. Seeing the reporters in the field sparked in her a dream to become a journalist.

“This is something that I…


She plans to pursue personal projects on issues such as environmental justice and immigration going forward.

Rosa Amanda Tuirán in August 2018 with a silhouette in San Francisco. The silhouette represents her father, who died in 2019.

By Camilla Forte

When she was in her early teens, Rosa Amanda Tuirán was gifted an old 35-millimeter film camera her mother dug out of a closet. The old 70s Cannon– coupled with a healthy consumption of films from her father’s extensive DVD collection– helped awaken her inner documentarian.

While Tuirán was growing up in Mexico, she began taking photography classes and learning more about the practice but chose to study International Relations as an undergraduate at the Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México.


“I just really want to keep working on human-centered stories that make people feel something, make people do something after they’ve seen the work.”

A self-portrait of Haiyun Jiang. (Photographs by Haiyun Jiang/NYT Institute)

By Sara Nevis

Fixated by the images of the Twin Towers burning on her TV on September 11, 2001, Haiyun Jiang, born and raised in China, saw her first glimpse of journalism unfold as the news coverage from that day continued.

“I was totally shocked by the visuals, but also very impressed by how dedicated those anchors and journalists kept reporting that 24/7,” Jiang said. “This is really interesting and fast paced, and I really liked…


She aims to produce visuals that illustrate people-centered stories.

Regardless of what situation she is in, Yehyun Kim meditates, does yoga and writes in a journal every day. The daily routine has helped her remember that the process to reach her goal as a photojournalist is also part of her life and enjoy the journey. (Photographs by Yehyun Kim/NYT Institute)

By Haiyun Jiang

“I remember my childhood through photos,” says Yehyun Kim, sitting on the other side of a Zoom call in her office chair. The 28-year-old photojournalist from Seoul, just finished a workday at the CT Mirror, a news organization based in Connecticut, where Yehyun is a second-year corps member with Report for America.

Growing up in Ilsan, a satellite city of Seoul, Yehyun learned to appreciate the power of visuals early on. “My mom died of cancer when I was 6, and I remember her through photos,” says Yehyun…


The police have been the first responders to mental crisis calls. But cities are seeking better ways to bring in mental health professionals.

Jennifer Giordano, right, a social worker, with Officer Nathan Sheehan of the Waterbury Police Department. She responds with the police to mental health crises. (Photographs by Yehyun Kim/NYT Institute)

This article is a project from The New York Times Student Journalism Institute, a professional development program for collegiate journalists.

By Yehyun Kim

There were no sirens. There were no flashing lights. Just a black and white Waterbury, Conn., police patrol car waiting silently by the curb.

A gray Chevy Cruze pulled up with Jennifer Giordano, 49, behind the wheel. Ms. Giordano, a social worker with the Connecticut Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services, parked the…

NYTSJI

The New York Times Student Journalism Institute is run by The New York Times in partnership with the Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY.

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